Tsuzuri Project to dedicate high-resolution facsimile of 17th-century Japanese artwork

Tsuzuri Project to dedicate high-resolution facsimile of 17th-century Japanese artwork

Tsuzuri Project to dedicate high-resolution facsimile of 17th-century Japanese artwork

The FINANCIAL -- TOKYO, June 28, 2018—Canon Inc. announced on June 27, that the Tsuzuri Project, a joint project organized by Canon and the Kyoto Culture Association (NPO), will dedicate a high-resolution facsimile of "Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter," whose original resides at the British Museum, to its original owner in Japan, Tanzan Shrine, located in Sakurai City, Nara Prefecture, as part of the project's Stage 11.

Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter, which depicts such natural symbols of autumn and winter as geese, ducks, white camellia and Japanese Sarcandra, is said to have been created during the Edo period (17th to 19th centuries) by the renowned Kano school of painting. It is a remarkable example of the Kano school's artistic style between the Momoyama period (late 16th to early 17th centuries) and the early Edo period (early 17th century).

Painted on sliding doors, this work was originally installed at Tanzan Shrine, which worships the deified Fujiwara Kamatari, a central figure behind the influential Taika Reforms of 645. Today, the original work is preserved at the British Museum as a shining example of Japanese art. Beginning with this latest effort, the Tsuzuri Project has updated the equipment used to create the facsimile, including cameras and lenses, in order to achieve higher resolution than ever before. With the dedication of Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter, the work may at last return to its original home at Tanzan Shrine, according to Canon.

The facsimile will be on permanent display made available for public viewing1 in the shrine's treasure hall, itself an important cultural property. In addition, visual content related to Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter will be viewable on the Canon homepage and at a special display on the shrine grounds from mid-August.