International Criminal Court Says It Is Undeterred By U.S. Threat Of Sanctions

International Criminal Court Says It Is Undeterred By U.S. Threat Of Sanctions

International Criminal Court Says It Is Undeterred By U.S. Threat Of Sanctions

The FINANCIAL -- The International Criminal Court (ICC) has said it will "continue to do its work undeterred," responding a day after U.S. national security adviser John Bolton threatened sanctions if the tribunal investigates alleged war crimes by U.S. personnel in Afghanistan.

The Hague-based court, which investigates genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, said in a statement on September 11 that it is an independent and impartial institution with the backing of 123 countries.

U.S. national-security adviser John Bolton will reportedly say Washington will consider sanctions against ICC judges.

In remarks on September 10, Bolton called the ICC "unaccountable" and "outright dangerous" to the United States and Israel and other allies.

The U.S. national security adviser said Washington was prepared to slap financial sanctions and criminal charges on ICC officials if they proceed against any Americans.

An ICC prosecutor requested in November 2017 to open an investigation into alleged war crimes committed by the U.S. military in Afghanistan, especially over the abuse of detainees.

Bolton said neither Afghanistan nor any other government party to the ICC's Rome Statute has requested an investigation. But he said the ICC could formally open the investigation "any day now."

The head of Afghanistan’s Human Rights Commission suggested that Bolton’s criticism of the ICC could strengthen a climate of impunity in the war-torn country.